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"I’m a nurse. I finished my PM shift at 9pm yesterday and actually came here to supply some equipment for my colleagues. But then the police just stood here and stopped me from going in. I told them I just wanted to put the stuff down and go home, but they said ‘No, you cant do this.’

I asked why, because I just wanted to help. Then they said, ‘Because if you go in, I can’t guarantee that you’ll make it back out.’ 

I told them it’s okay, and that I don’t care, but they just wouldn’t let me in.

What happened next is that they called more police to come and help. Twenty more police came just to stand towards me and my friend. People behind me were telling the police ‘They are nurses, they are helping us. Why don’t you let them go in?’

Then more and more people started arguing with the police. The police then said that if we kept on arguing and standing here, they would throw the tear gas at us. So I backed off, and went down to the MTR station where there was a first aid station. 

A few minutes later, tons of people ran down to the station for help. I could smell and feel the smoke.”

"I think Hong Kong people want to be peaceful and to make it very…in-order. But, we won’t just sit here and wait for them to attack us. Sometimes we might have to do some actions like block the streets. But still, we didn’t destroy anything. We have ten thousand - or even fifty thousand people coming, but no reports on the damage of any shops and government facilities. All of us are trying to make it in order, keep the place clean, and reduce the opportunity of violence, but I don’t know why the Hong Kong government is still giving us a response like this. I think they are trying to make us more angry, to make us to do something wrong or illegal. I want to say that Hong Kong people wont do that." 

"I’m feeling angry, and sad, and distressed because the Hong Kong government is not treating us as humans. Also, my parents don’t support me. They think this activity is supported by the US government. I don’t know why they think that."

"Are you worried about tonight?" 

"No, because we have so many people." 

"I’m quite surprised that the Hong Kong government used the tear bombs because we did not have any weapons on hand. I mean, we had some umbrellas."

"I think Hong Kong has changed. It’s totally different than before. Before, freedom was very important for Hong Kong people. I think now it’s still important, but some people have forgotten about it. We need to remember our independence."

"The purpose for us being here is because of the Government. They don’t understand our feelings. We feel…Not just angry - Angry is for the police, for what they did yesterday. They just attacked our citizens, but we had no weapons. That’s why we need more people, to support each other, this is the reason for us being here."

"We think that if we don’t strike and fight for what we want, we won’t get anything. The most immediate thing we hope is for CY Leung to step down. But eventually we want real universal suffrage. We don’t want to just vote for someone nominated by the Chinese government."

"A woman gets freedom and liberty and is respected by everyone in Hong Kong, unlike other Asian countries."

I recently teamed up with Sassy Hong Kong to provide a little more than just a glimpse into the lives of Hong Kongers. Read the rest of her story, and find out what it’s like to be a working woman in Hong Kong here.

"Something about the cityscape of Hong Kong’s illuminated skyscrapers surrounded by mountains that look straight from Jurassic Park make the architecture and various views of Hong Kong the most energising factor about living here. Pair the scenes of Hong Kong with its diverse demographics and it’s a perfect mix of urban energy." 

I recently teamed up with Sassy Hong Kong to provide a little more than just a glimpse into the lives of Hong Kongers. Read the rest of her story and find out what it’s like to be a working woman in Hong Kong here.

"There is a blog I follow ‘Sincerely, Jules’ and she has T-shirts that state ‘DREAM BELIEVE ACHIEVE’. That pretty much sums it up. If you want something enough, work towards it, and it will happen. I would never have thought 10 years ago that I would be living in Hong Kong working as a designer and running my own business” 

I recently teamed up with Sassy Hong Kong to provide a little more than just a glimpse into the lives of Hong Kongers. Read the rest of her story and find out what it’s like to be a working woman in Hong Kong here.

"What’s something that you’re currently struggling with?" 

"Hm..I really can’t think of anything. Life is pretty good right now. My children are doing really well, I have a great family. My kids are older and on their way to college! Well, one of them just completed college and the other one just started. So that’s probably why I’m not struggling.”

"What’s something that you regret the most?”

"That I didn’t get to spend enough time with my father before he passed away. When I was 18 years old I left home and went backpacking in different countries. Actually, before I went to America, I didn’t speak any English. I had some family that worked at a Chinese restaurant so i just stayed with them and worked. After saving enough money, I would go out and travel again."

"He’s an old dog, turning 13 soon. There are times when he doesn’t want to eat. He never really liked to play anyway, even when he was younger. Sometimes I actually think he’s dead! When he’s sleeping, I’ll go over to check just if he’s breathing."

"The hardest thing about being a dad is patience, and doing their homework. I feel like I’m studying for them. Sometimes I don’t even know how to do their homework and I’ll need to go online and search for the answers!"

"I used to take pictures of landscapes, but now I do portraits. I just feel that there is so much more spirit in the photos of portraits - Take my photo like this."